Blog Bellesguard Gaudí

Did you know? The Legends of Bellesguard

Did you know? The Legends of Bellesguard

By: Ferran Garcés A common question from visitors is whether there is any ghost haunting Bellesguard. The Gothic appearance of the building, especially on rainy autumn and winter days, easily sparks the imagination. The answer is no. Perhaps due to the prohibition sign for gnomes and ghosts that the Guilera family left when they were […]

Did you know? The Phoenix and the spiral, symbols of an era

Did you know? The Phoenix and the spiral, symbols of an era

By: Ferran Garcés We have started the year talking about the animal symbols of Bellesguard. We have also mentioned that the tower was built in two phases. The first, from 1900 to 1909, is led by Gaudí. The second, around 1916, corresponds to Domènec Sugrañes, one of his closest collaborators (he would continue the Sagrada […]

Guess what? Bellesguard’s Bestiary II: Roosters, Lions, and Horses

Guess what? Bellesguard’s Bestiary II: Roosters, Lions, and Horses

By: Ferran Garcés Taking advantage of the feast of Saint Anthony Abbot, the patron saint of animals, last Friday, we began a series of articles about Bellesguard’s peculiar bestiary. The first installment took us to the fish in the exterior mosaics of the main façade (link to the article). Today, we’ll continue with the fauna […]

Guess what? Bellesguard Bestiary I: Dolphins or Sharks

Guess what? Bellesguard Bestiary I: Dolphins or Sharks

By: Ferran Garcés This week, on January 17th, the celebration of Saint Anthony Abbot, the patron saint of animals and farmers, took place. In the past, people brought their livestock to churches to seek protection. Consequently, this occasion has been seized to declare the World Day of Blessing Animals, which this year includes both wild […]

“You know what? 2000 years of New Year… Part I

“You know what? 2000 years of New Year… Part I

By: Ferran Garcés   Header image: Nativity, Gueraru Gener, 1407-1411. Only the lower part, to focus on the nativity scene. In the header image, we showcase the Nativity by the Gothic painter from Barcelona, Guerau Gener (1). This work is contemporaneous with the ancient Bellesguard Castle, as it was painted between 1407 and 1411. Did […]

Did you know? The joy of light at Torre Bellesguard

Did you know? The joy of light at Torre Bellesguard

By: Ferran Garcés In the words of Gaudí himself: “Glory is light, light brings joy, and joy is the joy of the spirit.” We can see an example of this glory at the Cathedral of Mallorca, where, for both the Candelaria and Saint Martin, the Festival of Light is celebrated. At that time, hundreds of […]

Agenda: Wishing Workshop at Bellesguard

Agenda: Wishing Workshop at Bellesguard

By: Bellesguard Team Christmas is a time of hopes and aspirations. One year comes to an end, but a new one begins. Gradually, the days will become longer and warmer. In all cultures, this time has been surrounded by rituals celebrating the sun and light. Rituals that also revolved around a tree, the object of […]

Did you know? The origin of Christmas

Did you know? The origin of Christmas

By: Bellesguard Team The biblical account of the birth of Christ does not provide a specific date for when it took place. In fact, during the following two centuries, no one bothered to find out. The origin of Christmas dates back to the year 313, when Christianity became the official religion of the Roman Empire. […]

Calendar: Experience Christmas at Bellesguard!

Calendar: Experience Christmas at Bellesguard!

By: The Bellesguard Team A morning filled with history, art, and fun. That’s what we propose to you from Torre Bellesguard this Christmas. We blend Christmas and Gaudí with a unique activity: a Christmas trencadís workshop. With Mosaiccos, you’ll discover one of Gaudí’s most fascinating techniques and, in addition, explore one of the most unique […]

You know what? “Trencadís,” the technique of a genius.

You know what? “Trencadís,” the technique of a genius.

The main difference between mosaic, the traditional technique, and “trencadís” is that the pieces of the former have been designed, from the outset, as tiles and, therefore, follow regular measurements, which almost always apply to straight surfaces. In contrast, “trencadís” pieces can come from a coffee cup, a plate, a soup bowl, or a bottle. […]